Have you seen our latest free patterns?

We have two new patterns for you! Both are available as FREE downloads on Ravelry 🙂 One is perfect for warmer weather while the other will keep you cozy all winter long…


European Road Trip Shawl By Lisa Di Fruscia

A beautiful warm-weather accessory, our European Road Trip shawl is a simple parallelogram. It’s delicate yet rustic aesthetic was achieved by knitting Jade Sapphire SYLPH, a light fingering weight blend of cashmere (52%) and linen (48%), on 4 mm needles. Basic increases and decreases are used to obtain the sloped points at either end.

Finished dimensions are 80 inches x 24 inches (point to point).

DOWNLOAD pattern from Ravelry.

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Gateway to Rustic by Melissa Clulow

Our Gateway to Rustic cowl pattern has just been added to Ravelry!  As the name implies, this pattern serves as a gentle introduction to a more rustic yarn (Tukuwool), especially for those who love working with softer hand-dyed superwash yarns. While the Hedgehog Fibres Skinny Singles and Shibui Knits Silk Cloud provide softness and luxury, this pattern is a great way to test-drive woolier, less processed yarns in combination to discover their unique properties. In this case, the Tukuwoo Fingeringl lends lovely structure, gorgeous colour, and lofty warmth. Before you know it, you’ll be chatting breed-specific qualities while you dash off stranded mittens and yoked sweaters 😀!

DOWNLOAD pattern from Ravelry.

 

New speckled colourways in Julie Asselin Fino!

julie_asselin_speckles

We have some pretty new speckled colourways in Julie Asselin’s Fino yarn in stock! Fino is a heavenly soft and luxurious blend of merino, cashmere, and silk, ideal for knit or crochet shawls and accessories and lightweight garments. Unfortunately, the Pixel colourway (top left) is already nearly sold out – but more is on the way. The other three are limited editions so get ’em while they’re hot!

SHOP Fino in our webstore.

–  Melissa

LYKKE Interchangeable Needle Sets are back in stock!

lykke_interchangeable_denim

Made of strong birch wood, the LYKKE Driftwood needles are smooth and light and a true pleasure to work with. With their warm character, these handsome sets are easy on the hands and the eyes Each interchangeable set includes 12 durable pairs of needle tips – sizes 3.5 mm through 12 mm (US4 – US 17). Each set also contains two cords for 24 in length, two cords for 32 in length, one cord for 40 in length, two connectors, two keys, and eight stoppers. Packed in beautiful, high quality grey faux denim (above) or black faux leather cases (see below).

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 – Melissa

On the C Train – a new free pattern from Espace Tricot!

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A luxurious ribbed hat knit with Woolfolk Far and Shibui Silk Cloud held together. It was cast on while riding the C Train from Brooklyn into New York on a recent trip we took to the Big Apple. 🙂 Stylish, chic, and warm!

Please note: We used the entire skein of Far for this hat so if your gauge is off, you may run out of yarn


Click here to access free pattern.

SHOP Woolfolk Far in our webstore.
SHOP Shibui Silk Cloud in our webstore.

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Holiday Hours

In preparation for the holidays, please consult our store hours below:

HOLIDAY SCHEDULE

Monday, December 19th
Tuesday, December 20th
Wednesday, December 21st
Thursday, December 22nd
Friday, December 23rd
Saturday, December 24th
Sunday, December 25th
Monday, December 26th
Tuesday, December 27th
Wednesday, December 28th
Thursday, December 29th
Friday, December 30th
Saturday, January 31st
Sunday, January 1st
Monday, January 2nd
Closed
10:30 – 5:00
10:30 – 5:00
10:30 – 8:00 | Holiday Party from 6:00
10:30 – 5:00
10:30 – 3:00
Closed
Closed
10:30 – 5:00
10:30 – 5:00
10:30 – 5:00
10:30 – 5:00 | Knit Clinic cancelled
10:30 – 3:00
Closed
Closed

En prĂ©paration pour les fĂȘtes, voici nos heures d’ouverture.

HORAIRE DES FETES

Lundi, 19 décembre
Mardi, 20 décembre
Mercredi, 21 décembre
Jeudi, 22 décembre
Vendredi, 23 décembre
Samedi, 24 décembre
Dimanche, 25 décembre
Lundi, 26 décembre
Mardi, 27 décembre
Mercredi, 28 décembre
Jeudi, 29 décembre
Vendredi, 30 décembre
Samedi, 31 décembre
Dimanche, 1 janvier
Lundi, 2 janvier
Fermé
10h30 – 17h00
10h30 – 17h00
10h30 – 20h00 | dĂšs 18h00 FĂȘte de NoĂ«l
10h30 – 17h00
10h30 – 15h00
Fermé
Fermé
10h30 – 17h00
10h30 – 17h00
10h30 – 17h00
10h30 – 17h00 | Clinique tricot annulĂ©
10h30 – 15h00
Fermé
Fermé

New Bookhou!

A gorgeous new delivery of Bookhou pouches (and a few bags) landed in store today! Bookhou, based in Toronto, emphasizes natural handmade materials and small production pieces.  Each piece is a beautifully crafted work of art.

SHOP all Bookhou products in our webstore!


LARGE POUCHES

Bookhou’s hand-drawn, hand-screened prints on a great little pouch to hold your notions and other essentials or to use alone as a small clutch. 100% linen with 100% cotton canvas lining. Brass metal zipper with leather pull. Approximate dimensions: W 10.5 x H 7 x D 2 in.

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bookhou_large_pouch_veld_light

bookhou_large_pouch_dark_veld

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POCKET POUCHES

Bookhou’s hand-drawn, hand-screened prints on a smaller companion pouch. Also perfect for organizing your notions and supplies. 100% linen with 100% cotton lining. Approximate dimensions: W 6 x H 5 in. (15.24 x 12.7 cm)

bookhou_pocket_pouches


CARRY BAG

This bag is printed with Bookhou’s original veld drawing in a putty grey solvent free ink on 100% black cotton canvas, with a dark oak waxed canvas bottom. A great everyday bag.
W 15 x H 13 (11in. to gusset) x D 4.5 in. (W 38.10 x H 33.02 D 11.43 cm)

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Just re-stocked: Snap ‘n Go Cases & Digital Row Counters

SNAP ‘N GO NOTIONS CASES – JUMBO

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Jumbo-sized Snap ‘n Go Notions Casesℱ have eight little compartments to keep all your knitting and crocheting notions neatly separated. Organize your life in a snap and go! The first side features four small rectangular compartments that are perfect for storing stitch markers, buttons, and other tiny knitting notions. Flip apart the second half to reveal three long compartments that are great for holding things like stitch holders, darning needles, and point protectors. Finally, the big single compartment sandwiched in the center is perfect for larger items like mini crochet hooks, cable needles, T-pins, and tape measures. This compact little beauty has a hard, sturdy outer shell made of heavy-duty plastic. A hole for a lanyard or key chain is located near the hinge. Notions not included.

Purchase in store or online here.


DIGITAL ROW COUNTERS

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A digital row counter is the perfect accessory for hands free counting while you knit or crochet. No more stopping to make a mark on a piece of paper or cranking a manual row counter. The electronic counter has a 5 digit LCD screen display that can count from 0 up to 99999 rows with 2 soft touch rubberized silver buttons to control it. Made from ABS plastic, the same material used for Lego. The row counter uses a standard AG10 1.5v button cell battery, so when it wears out, simply unscrew the back of the counter to replace it.

Purchase in store or online here.

– Melissa

New store sample: The Linde Shift

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A simple and chic layering piece, The Linde Shift by Vladimira Ilkovicova for Blue Sky Alpacas looks great over everything from a buttoned-up shirt / blouse to a fitted tank or tee. Blue Sky Alpacas Sport Weight lends just the right amount of structure and drape and is a luxurious pleasure to knit. Worked in one long panel from end to end. Casual sophistication!

View additional photos and project details on our Ravelry page.
Shop BSA Sport Weight and BSA Melange (same yarn in heathered colour ways).

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–  Melissa

Freia Refined Merino / Silk Ombre Fingering now re-stocked (+ 3 new colours)!

Freia_Fingering_Dirty Hippie

(Colour: Dirty Hippie)

Freia Refined Merino / Silk Ombre Fingering (70% merino, 30% silk) is a smooth 3-ply yarn with a luxurious soft hand beautifully dyed in Freia’s stunning long-line signature colourways. This particular quality has been specifically developed to be lofty without pilling. Merino brings structure while the silk adds just a hint of sheen.

Shop all 18 colourways of Freia Refined Merino / Silk Fingering online.

Browse projects knit with Freia Ombre Fingering here!

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(Colour: Grapevine)

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(Colour: Lucas)

–  Melissa

Free pattern Friday: Simple House Slippers

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(Photos: Simone A.)

These Simple House Slippers by Simone Alexandra are as easy to wear as they are to knit. The pattern is knit flat at the back (garter stitch) and then in the round for the rest of the foot (stockinette).  The toe has a very rounded shape like the top of mittens making these look and feel more like real slippers than house socks.  Cozy and classic.  Start now and knit a bunch of these in time for holiday gift-giving (yes, I really said that – it’s never too soon to get started)!

Suitable for beginners as well as more advanced knitters looking for an in-between project.

One size fits most.

– Melissa

Sweater 101 – Sweaters With Set In Sleeves

Well, hello there. I know I have been AWOL for quite a while, but here I am now. Back to business.

I have told you about the Raglan sweater and the Drop Shoulder one – now here is another: The sweater with Set in Sleeves.

In my opinion this is the kind that you can make fit best. The sleeves, as the name says, are fitted to your body, due to what is called the armscye they are not too big and not too small – when the sweater is well done. The armscye is the edge of the knitting to which the sleeve is sewn. When the scye is the right size, the sleeve will fit like a glove and you do not have to worry about bunching of too much fabric or stretching of too little.

Sweaters like these are usually knit in pieces and then seamed. That gives them stability, other than a Raglan knit from the top down that can stretch in every which way.

A lot of people like knitting sweaters in pieces, the work is manageable, you plug along one piece at a time. Fewer people enjoy seaming the sweater – which is not really hard but needs some practice and preparation. There are a lot of things you can do during knitting to make it easier, the most important one is to have a selvedge stitch (I prefer them in Stockinette Stitch) on each edge. Makes seaming a cinch. Seaming row by row makes for a nice join, and just looks the best, if you ask me.

If you do not like seaming, do not despair. There are patterns with Set in Sleeves that you can knit from the top down, which get joined in the round after the armhole shaping and that make you knit the so-to-speak Set in Sleeves with short rows. I have done it, it is not exactly like the sweater knit in pieces and then seamed, but it is close.

This is my bit for today – I hope it was helpful.

Happy Knitting, as ever!

– Mona

Dropping The Ball Stitch

Dropping stitches is usually a stressful event since under normal circumstances we do not want stitches to drop. However, there are stitch patterns out there that make you drop stitches on purpose. Yes, you read right. On these occasions you really want to drop the stitches (or, as you will see, yarn overs) to achieve an airy, loose pattern that you can use to create different effects.

One pattern that makes use of this technique is the ever so popular “Clapotis” by Kate Gilbert which celebrates its 10th birthday this year.

Picture from here. Close up of dropped stitches.

Another example for achieving an interesting fabric using dropped stitches is the “Harpswell Apron” by Pam Allen. Stitches get dropped after a certain number of rows alternately.

Picture from here.

Both of these designs are in spite of the dropped stitches structured knits, yet they have an airy feel due to the gaps that are created.

Another way to use dropped stitches is to achieve a deconstructed look, meaning yes, it is a garment but looks quite different from what we usually expect.

Picture from here.

“Les Miserables” by Cynthia Parker uses exactly the same technique, yet the deconstruction is enhanced by slightly felting the knitted fabric.

Picture from here.

The “Dropped Stitch Cardigan” by Erica Patberg makes excessive use of dropped stitches with a quite dramatic effect. Another example for a deconstructed look.

The other way of ‘dropping stitches’ is to work elongated stitches by dropping yarn overs from the row before. One can achieve an even row of long stitches or a wavy pattern depending on the number of yarn overs worked.

Picture from here.

#13 Drop Stitch Scarf by Laura Bryant (published in Vogue Knitting Spring/Summer 2009) makes use of both techniques – you drop stitches and have dropped yarn overs forming elongated rows which results in a light, airy fabric that makes for a lovely summer scarf when knit in a light summery yarn.

As you might have seen, Melissa just finished a design making use of the dropped stitches also. Shibui Twig gives it a textural quality, yet it is also light an airy.

1SS15 | Tier by Shellie Anderson. Sample is now in store!

I am currently knitting the “Spring Lace Infinity Scarf” by Purl Avenue – knit in Shibui Linen the lace pattern combined with dropped stitches makes a for a delicate fabric.

A class for this particular pattern starts on Monday and there are a few spaces left, if you feel so inclined!

Picture from here.

I have chosen only a few from a wide selection –  check out ravelry.com for any number of possible designs and make your pick as you please!

Happy Knitting, as ever!

– Mona

Do You Give A Damn?

About the “Color of the Year”?

Well, this is it.

Just in case you feel like whipping up a summery design in that particular colorway, I checked on our inventory to see if we could oblige.

Shibui Linen, Bordeaux

Classic Elite Yarns - Firefly, 7727 Sangria

Classic Elite Firefly, Sangria

Quince Sparrow, Port

Rowan Creative Linen, Raspberry

As with every color, there are different interpretations. But these come as close as possible. Four out of, well, I don’t really know, but a lot of colors and summer yarns we have in stock.

It seems yarn companies do not bow to fashion trends much, I rather think they develop colors true to the owners/creative designers taste.

I, for one, wish the yarn industry cared a bit more for what is in fashion to be able to cater to our customers, however, having worked in the business, I do also know that the cycle of yarn is much different from the short lived trends in the fashion world. Then again, do we knitters really care that much? Knitting a sweater is like cooking ‘slow food’ – instead of going out buying whatever is available (i.e. ‘fast food’) we choose a design and put time and love into creating it. Meanwhile the fashion devotee is on to the third trend of the season and has to hurry to keep up. Which is really not what I personally am about.

So I have to ask myself: Do I give a damn, really?

Happy Knitting, as ever!

– Mona

Sheer Spring

‘Sheer’ as in ‘nearly.’

‘Sheer’ as in ‘diaphanous’ (no one tell me I do not make an effort with the English language) also.

Diaphanous is big this year – especially for Spring and Summer. It is not new, the sheer, see through fabrics usually turn up around this time of year, yet I find some or other new idea that I feel drawn to.

Pictures courtesy of eileenfisher.com

These two sweaters are just an example – there are so many possibilities for us knitters to get inspired.

I will admit that knitting a sweater like that is usually a bit of work, since you want to use a fairly thin yarn on slightly larger needles than you would use normally – but the effect is worth the effort.

Lets face it: There is rarely a summer knit I feel comfortable wearing without a tee or a cami underneath, this way I make at least the most of it.

You might be surprised how much pops up by just entering ‘sheer’ into the pattern search on ravelry. However, you can just look at all the designs and imagine them in a thinner yarn that would make them light, airy and summery.  Here are some of my front runners:

The Silken Straw Summer Sweater by Purl Soho. Picture form here. Think Habu Tsumugi Silk, for a special kick Silk Stainless held together with the Fine Merino or Handmaiden Lino (which is available in store, and we just got new stock!).

Yes, I know, this one (Sweet Jane) does not look diaphanous. It is knit up at a gauge of 25 sts with a fingering weight. Now imagine this knit up with Handmaiden Lino, a fantastic linen/silk mix in a lace weight and there you go! Picture from here.

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Yes, indeed. This is one of our newer store samples, the Taiyo Linier Top in Shibui Linen and Silk Cloud. I tried it on and quite like it! Imagine it also in Quince Sparrow, Shibui Twig or Classic Elite Firefly. At a gauge of 18 stitches this one knits up in almost a flash!

One designer who has this look down to a tee is one of our all time favourites: Cocoknits. Check it out and pick your shoo-ins!

Now, wasn’t this inspiring and ‘sheer entertainment’?

Happy knitting, as ever!

– Mona

WWMD*

It seems like Spring is slowly creeping upon us – finally! At the store we have new stock of summer yarns, including a few new ones I am itching to knit with like Quince Kestrel (a linen ribbon yarn) and Shibui Twig (a mix of recycled silk, linen and a bit of wool with a cool texture). I just have to find the right patterns.

What I am working on right now is a store sample worked in Drops Bomull Lin, a cotton linen mix in a worsted weight. This particular Drops pattern asks to knit the yarn quite loosely – as often with summer sweaters – and this in return opens up a whole box of questions about finishing.

I get them quite often at the store. Most of the times I am able to give you tips, other times I am not sure because it is quite tricky to advise something I haven’t done myself.

So here is another part of *What Would Mona Do.

First of all, when knitting summer yarns loosely, do not freak out about how uneven the knitting looks. Mine does too. Sometimes more so, sometimes less, usually not very pretty.

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Don’t fret – just steam! After a good steam blocking the sleeve looks like this:

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Much better, right?

Now, this particular sweater is knit in pieces that need to be seamed.

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Not so pretty either with all these ends hanging about. There is a good reason for it, though. In this case I have decided I am going to seam the sweater first and then ‘hide’ the ends in the seams, this way they won’t show. I could have woven the ends into the edge first, however that would make seaming a bit more difficult – so, seam first, weave after.

I might have mentioned it before, but here I go again: If you put a bit of thought into what comes after the knitting (finishing!) then you might be able to prepare that during knitting. It makes things usually easier and less daunting.

That is my morsel of WWMD for today.

Happy Knitting, as ever!

Mona